Southern stray dogs flood dog shelters in New York City


Every weekend, dozens of Southern stray dogs are brought to New York City.

Vans bursting with crate dogs crisscross the city after hours on the road.

The dogs are then handed over to foster “parents” – and ultimately adopted for hundreds of dollars, payable to the rescue nonprofit that arranged for their transport.

City dog ​​advocates note that more favorable weather conditions and a lack of spay / neuter laws in the South mean more strayers there. Rescuers “pull” the dogs here, away from the killing shelters. Although many end up with loving families, the practice also contributes to overcrowding in urban shelters, according to the ASPCA and other groups.

The crates containing the animals were stacked unevenly up to the ceiling of a 15-passenger van with temporary plates.
JCRice
Every weekend, dozens of Southern stray dogs are brought to New York City.
Every weekend, dozens of Southern stray dogs are brought to New York City.
JCRice

One Saturday morning in late August, The Post observed dozens of dogs being unloaded in South Street Harbor.

They had been bred directly from Georgia under the umbrella of Waldo’s Rescue Pen, a tax-exempt dog rescue based in Manhattan.

The crates containing the animals were stacked unevenly up to the ceiling of a 15-passenger van with temporary plates.

That same morning, The Post observed a similar operation underway in Madison Square Park: dogs were being distributed from a van driven from Texas by Hearts & Bones Rescue, which did not return messages seeking comment.

Badass Animal Rescue announces the same model. The Brooklyn-based rescue features “sweet, loving, adoptable dogs from high-mortality books in the rural south.” The rescue also did not return any emails.

Unofficial data shows thousands of dogs are being imported into shelters in New York City. Last year, 3,274 shelter dogs were transferred to New York City, according to Shelter Animals Count, a nonprofit that maintains a national database. This exceeds the 2,304 dogs returned to the city by their owners, and is just below the number of stray dogs picked up in the five boroughs, 3,297.

There is no official count of the number of Southern stray dogs imported into New York City. New Yorkers must license their dogs from the Department of Health, but applications do not ask for a place of origin.

Unofficial data shows thousands of dogs are being imported into shelters in New York City.
Unofficial data shows thousands of dogs are being imported into shelters in New York City.
JCRice

Dozens of dogs, mostly pit bull mixes, are listed on rescues websites.

Local advocates say the influx of dogs from out of town means more dogs need to be slaughtered here.

Rescues must be registered with the Department of Agriculture and State Markets, but that is the scope of government regulations.

“Unfortunately, while pet stores are regulated and inspected, rescues are not. There are no laws for their activities except to be registered, ”the state agency told local whistleblowers in a recent email. “Currently, there are no enforceable state laws against rescues.”

Spokeswoman Jola Szubielski confirmed that the agency had no “inspection authority” for rescues, “as is the case with pet dealers.”

Christa Chadwick, Director of Accommodation Services at ASPCA, said: “Animal roaming is a complex problem requiring multifaceted solutions. Among the challenges, in some areas there are animals at risk of euthanasia due to oversupply, while in other areas they are at risk of euthanasia because they have medical problems and behavioral issues that require intensive support and resources to help them find the right homes. . “

A representative from the Animal Care Centers of NYC, a taxpayer-funded nonprofit that operates public shelters in the city, said Dixie’s dogs were competing for adoption with their Yankee counterparts.

“There are a lot of dogs coming to New York City from shelters in the south because they have a much better chance of being adopted in the northeast. There are also large dogs in need of homes here in New York City. And these are the dogs that ACC is trying to get adopted, ”Representative Katy Hansen told The Post.


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